Symposium

Of Rising ScholarsFall 2022

Laxya will be presenting at The Symposium of Rising Scholars on Saturday, September 24th! To attend the event and see Laxya's presentation,

Register here!
Go to Polygence Scholars page
Laxya Kumar's cover illustration
Polygence Scholar2022
Laxya Kumar's profile

Laxya Kumar

Monta Vista High SchoolClass of 2024

About

Projects

  • "Learning Quantum Computing with Python!" with mentor Ian (Sept. 16, 2022)

Project Portfolio

Learning Quantum Computing with Python!

Started May 2, 2022

Abstract or project description

Why is Quantum Computing more efficient than Classical Computing? What does it mean for a quantum computer to be “faster” than a classical computer? What types of algorithms can run faster on a quantum computer than on a classical computer? We plan to prove these claims of the increased efficiency of Quantum Computing by studying Deutsch’s Algorithm, one of the first Quantum Computer Algorithms developed.

We plan to prove these claims of the increased efficiency of Quantum Computing by studying Deutsch’s Algorithm, one of the first Quantum Computer Algorithms developed.

We plan to answer these questions by first developing an understanding of Quantum mechanics and its description of physical systems. Following this we plan to develop a simulation of a Quantum Computer inside a Classical Computer, using programming languages such as Python. This simulation will enable us to study Quantum logic gates and their behavior in implementing classical algorithms and quantum algorithms. We can get a sense of the scaling of different algorithms by the inputs of their different sizes. Our final effort will be to compare the scaling from Deutsch’s algorithm from the scaling of the fastest known classical algorithm.

We will start by building a simulation of the Quantum Infinite Square Well in Python to get a sense of Quantum Mechanics as well as some experience programming. Based on that simulation we could build a model of a set of Quantum Bits and study the configurations in which they can exist. Then we can move on and study the operators that can act on those Bits, and investigate how these operators can be composed to build Quantum Logic Gates. After we reach this point, we will be ready to implement Deutsch’s Algorithm, which we will test on a relatively small Bit set. Finally we can scale up the size of the Bit set and prove that Deutsch’s Algorithm has advantageous scaling characteristics compared to Classical Algorithms.