Symposium

Of Rising ScholarsFall 2022

Krishna will be presenting at The Symposium of Rising Scholars on Saturday, September 24th! To attend the event and see Krishna's presentation,

Register here!
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Krishna Chemudupati's cover illustration
Polygence Scholar2022
Krishna Chemudupati's profile

Krishna Chemudupati

Windermere Preparatory SchoolClass of 2023Winter Garden, Florida

About

Projects

  • "How do variations in environmental factors affect mass-production and harvesting of biodiesel from the green algae Chlorophyceae in paddlewheel raceway-style ponds?" with mentor Alina (Working project)

Project Portfolio

How do variations in environmental factors affect mass-production and harvesting of biodiesel from the green algae Chlorophyceae in paddlewheel raceway-style ponds?

Started Apr. 16, 2022

Abstract or project description

In a world that is increasingly reliant on energy, fossil fuels such as coal, petroleum, and natural gas are an unsustainable and scarce resource to be dependent on. Finding renewable sources of energy that can efficiently support the needs of the modern world is integral to the advancement of society. The following scientific review closely examines the avenue of cultivating microalgae in order to serve as a source of fuel. Of the various models of mass-producing fuel (biodiesel) from microalgae, one of the most commonly used methods is through open paddlewheel raceway-style ponds. In these open pond systems, various factors such as pH, temperature, and CO2 concentration in which the microalgae is cultivated can affect the efficiency of biodiesel production. Several such limitations exist when considering biodiesel obtained from microalgae as an alternative to fossil fuels. Therefore, this investigation serves to highlight the drawbacks and potential future implications of the renewable alternative. For a clearer understanding of the impacts of these factors, the class Chlorophyceae of microalgae is considered in this review. Class Chlorophyceae algae include the species Chlamydomonas, Chlorella, Dunaliella, Oedogonium, and Volvox. Chlorophyceae primarily occur in freshwater bodies and are often the most ecologically and scientifically studied class of microalgae. This class of algae is also known to contain a significant amount of lipids and is therefore ideal to use in systems designed for biodiesel extraction from microalgae. Furthermore, the conditions will be observed in a microalgae culture grown in wastewater as doing so allows for the use of dissolved nutrients in an otherwise unused substance. (Need to add results after the investigation).