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Polygence Scholar2023
Cheney Wu's profile

Cheney Wu

Class of 2025Detroit, Michigan

About

Hello! My name is Cheney and my Polygence project is on designing a new and effective airplane wing that would change its shape throughout flight according to outside factors (such as turbulence, load, and/or during different phases of flight). I chose to work on this project because I've liked airplanes ever since I was little and designing something related to it would be an awesome accomplishment, at the same time the process of designing would be good practice for what I want to do in university. After my project is complete, I would like to continue working on these small projects that come to mind by using the skills I've learned from this one.

Projects

  • "How can we create an optimum design that would improve the process of creating tensegrity adaptive airfoils?" with mentor Nate (Working project)
  • "How can we reduce the drag acted upon an airplane in different stages of flight by changing the shapes of parts of the wing to their desired position using Shape Memory Alloys?" with mentor Nate (July 26, 2023)

Project Portfolio

How can we create an optimum design that would improve the process of creating tensegrity adaptive airfoils?

Started Dec. 12, 2023

Abstract or project description

For any tensegrity designs, we need to develop tensegrity structures, select the number of tensegrity cells, and decide the node placement at critical points for both airfoils curvatures and the tensegrity function(s). Then, we need to evaluate the pros and cons of each design before an optimized design is achieved. This project plans to develop an effective tool that will automatically generate node placement and tensegrity matrices for a given design concept so that further tensegrity modeling calculations. This project will explore two tensegrity design concepts for airfoils. The first design possibility is to include two D-bar structures off to the side of each airfoil, with intermediary T-bar designs incorporated into the middle of the two D-bar structures. The second design option is to add repetitive T-bar structures throughout the airfoil instead of replacing the outer curvature, strengthening the outer curvature by tenting them outward at critical points along the airfoil.

Project Portfolio

How can we reduce the drag acted upon an airplane in different stages of flight by changing the shapes of parts of the wing to their desired position using Shape Memory Alloys?

Started Sept. 21, 2022

Abstract or project description

Shape Memory Alloys (SMAs) are a special kind of metal that, after being preset a position, has the ability to be deformed into other shapes under lower temperatures and return to its original state when exposed to heat. This research aims to examine the different ways to utilize NiTi alloys, or Nitinol (a type of SMA specifically with a mixture of 55% Nickel and 45% Titanium) and how they can help minimize forms of drag acting on an aircraft during different stages of flight. The primary advantage of utilizing SMAs to morph parts of a wing in place of secondary flight controls is the weight reduction they offer, which reduces fuel consumption and drag, increasing the range and overall efficiency of the aircraft. Various strings of Nitinol will be connected to their corresponding Primary Flight Computers (PRIMs), such as the Elevator/Aileron Computer (ELAC), Spoiler/Elevator Computer (SEC), and the Flight Augmentation Computer (FAC), and will be able to respond accordingly by passing an electric current through them to reach their transformation temperature. Using computational simulations, Nitinol's desired positions are determined under the three primary flight control laws; Normal Law, Alternate Law, and Direct Law.