Symposium

Of Rising Scholars

Spring 2024

Alina will be presenting at The Symposium of Rising Scholars on Saturday, March 23rd! To attend the event and see Alina's presentation.

Go to Polygence Scholars page
Alina Huang's cover illustration
Polygence Scholar2023
Alina Huang's profile

Alina Huang

Class of 2024San Jose, CA

About

Projects

  • "Publish an article: Kickstart your career as a scholar learning the neuroscience of how your brain interprets sound" with mentor Rahul (Sept. 11, 2023)
  • "Unveiling the Connection: COVID-19 Infections and Vaccinations' Impact on Epstein-Barr Virus Reactivation" with mentor Kim-Marie (Nov. 26, 2023)

Project Portfolio

Publish an article: Kickstart your career as a scholar learning the neuroscience of how your brain interprets sound

Started Aug. 1, 2023

Portfolio item's cover image

Abstract or project description

The brain is incredible and complex and the source of much scientific research around the world. In this pod, you’ll focus on how our brains allow us to take unassuming sound waves and enable us to enjoy music, learn a new language, or recognize danger. Through this fascinating process, students will learn about the research process, the brain regions, how the brain regions cooperate to interpret sensory information, and how those individual actions culminate into the actions we take every day but may take for granted.

Project Portfolio

Unveiling the Connection: COVID-19 Infections and Vaccinations' Impact on Epstein-Barr Virus Reactivation

Started June 22, 2023

Abstract or project description

Studies have suggested that COVID-19 infection or vaccination can lead to the reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a common lymphotropic herpesvirus virus that spreads through saliva and is prevalent in young adults. In most cases EBV infection results in cold-like symptoms, though recent research has found that EBV infection actually increases the likelihood of developing multiple sclerosis (MS), the most pervasive chronic debilitating neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS), by thirty-fold. This paper discusses the research that supports the link between COVID-19 infection and vaccination and EBV reactivation. In particular, we identify what connects these two viral infections. This topic has broad implications for understanding how COVID-19 exposure (through infection or vaccination) can lead to detrimental effects of EBV reactivation.